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25 Apr 2013

Fantastic new animation: ‘Carbon Omissions: how the UK outsourced its carbon footprint’

Here’s a wonderful new video from Carbon Omissions¬†which uses animation to beautifully make a very important point:

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3 Comments

Brad K.
26 Apr 1:43pm

Interesting.

What stands out for me, is that there is no mention of co-locating work, shopping (groceries, anyone?), and employment/work/craft/etc.

No mention of returning to the owner-occupied craft place or store. No mention of replacing automobiles with walking-distance destination. No mention of re-examining “higher education” to reduce the effect of stripping communities of the most talented people to supply factory and major corporation employment grist mills. No mention of how the burden of collected tax revenues and corporate revenues are re-burdened by the costs of operating a corporation or government, and the spinoff industries that reburden, again, the money spent by governments and corporations. (By burden, I mean the cost in energy and carbon footprint required to produce that unit of currency). No mention of the consumerism inherent in personal and corporate (in the “bodies of human activity” sense) ambition — from planned obsolescence to “moving up” to new residence, “better” furnishings and wardrobe, glitzier TVs and personal electronics. No mention of abandoning a hedonistic, singles lifestyle for a staid, generations-focused and conservative family life.

I guess they had a single point to make, they just glossed over a few of the details.

Amanda
26 Apr 9:35pm

Often a single point is best made simply – after all, it was never meant to be documentary length. Loved it.

Richard Hawkins
28 Apr 2:04pm

Glad you liked it Amanda, and sorry we couldn’t fit everything in Brad… !